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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    39

    Default how to make oil paints dry slower...much slower?

    Hi
    I apologize in advance for a long winded question.
    I paint thinly and I need these thinly painted parts to dry very slow: I cannot retouch them after they dry. I use walnut oil but not much because too much oil will not result in a texture I want.
    I don't paint over this layer after it is dry.
    I experimented with Grumbacher's Painting Medium II that slows drying, but it does not keep paint wet for amount of time I need, e.g. five-six days.
    It is a combination of very little pigment and not much oil that makes the paint to dry too fast.
    Also, slow drying colors like ivory black are not the colors I use in those passages. It's usually a relatively fast drying earth color.
    Is there a medium or combination you can suggest to slow drying time beyond what walnut oil can provide?
    thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default How to make oil paints dry slower ... much slower?

    Quote Originally Posted by nickm View Post
    Hi
    I apologize in advance for a long winded question.
    I paint thinly and I need these thinly painted parts to dry very slow: I cannot retouch them after they dry. I use walnut oil but not much because too much oil will not result in a texture I want.
    I don't paint over this layer after it is dry.
    I experimented with Grumbacher's Painting Medium II that slows drying, but it does not keep paint wet for amount of time I need, e.g. five-six days.
    It is a combination of very little pigment and not much oil that makes the paint to dry too fast.
    Also, slow drying colors like ivory black are not the colors I use in those passages. It's usually a relatively fast drying earth color.
    Is there a medium or combination you can suggest to slow drying time beyond what walnut oil can provide?
    thank you
    nickm,

    We can think of three things to try.

    1.) Put your unfinished paintings in a cold environment. If you live where it gets cold in the winter, put them on the back porch overnight -- somewhere where they will stay clean and not blow away! Cold temperatures will delay the drying of oils and oil paints.

    2.) Both poppyseed oil and safflower oil are slower drying oils. Experiment to learn which will work better for your circumstances.

    3.) Add a very small amount of Oil of Spike, lavender, to your paint -- perhaps one drop per inch of paint out of the tube. This one is risky: if you add too much, the paints might not dry at all. Again, experiment to learn what is the least amount you can use to do the job.

    Please tell us what you decide to do after your experiments, and whether it works!
    The AMIEN Staff

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Thank you for your suggestions.
    Two follow up questions:

    1.Is is safe or advisable to mix Oil of Spike with any other oil like poppyseed oil and safflower?

    2. Do poppyseed oil and safflower oil dry faster than walnut or there are properties of walnut oil that makes it less desirable?

    Thanks again for your help!

  4. #4

    Default

    One problem here comes from paint manufacturers adding driers to their tubes. The majority of them do.

    You'd either have to look for a brand that does not add driers (or claim so), I know two in Europe that do: Michael Harding in the UK and Isaro in Belgium. The Isaro titanium white for instance, stays wet (as in just applied) several days easily. Kept inside.

    Of course, you don't want to throw away all your tubes. This is what you can do; decide which colors you are going to use, put the paint on a paper towel, let the oil soak out, in your case, at least three hours I would say. Then, with the knife, you mix some poppy seed oil or walnut oil if you like (I'd use poppy oil for the faster drying pigments, the earths and the cobalts) in the dense paint till you get the desired consistency.

    Some colors are rapid driers in themselves, as you probably know, they will still dry harder but I guess with poppy oil you might gain a day.

    If you like this method, you might consider opening your tubes at the back, scraping all the paint out, letting all of it drain on paper towels, and refill the tubes with the poppy / walnut added. You might mix some walnut into the poppy if you don't like the thickness of poppy oil.

    This will take care of two problems: it'll drain most of the manufacturers' oil (and added driers) out of the paint, and you can add a slower drying paint.

    Experiment!

    It works rather well. Or, grind your own paint! But grind it well, to get all the microscopic air bubbles out of it that'll make it dry fast just the same.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Desert Hot Springs, CA
    Posts
    34

    Default

    You can also try adding a very small amount of oil of clove to your paint nut. Experiment with this on a sample panel to determine how much to use. It will definitely retard drying, and you don't necessarily have to blot existing oil from the paint.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default Making oil paints dry slower

    Quote Originally Posted by nickm View Post
    Thank you for your suggestions.
    Two follow up questions:

    1.Is is safe or advisable to mix Oil of Spike with any other oil like poppyseed oil and safflower? Yes, but in very small quantities.

    2. Do poppyseed oil and safflower oil dry faster than walnut or there are properties of walnut oil that makes it less desirable? They dry slower than walnut oil. Walnut oil has no undesirable qualities that we know of -- but that might be dependent on the brand and what additives, if any, are in the oil.

    Thanks again for your help!
    nickm,

    We hope this helps some more.
    The AMIEN Staff

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default Even more on lampblack

    Quote Originally Posted by WimVanAalst View Post
    One problem here comes from paint manufacturers adding driers to their tubes. The majority of them do.

    You'd either have to look for a brand that does not add driers (or claim so), I know two in Europe that do: Michael Harding in the UK and Isaro in Belgium. The Isaro titanium white for instance, stays wet (as in just applied) several days easily. Kept inside.

    Of course, you don't want to throw away all your tubes. This is what you can do; decide which colors you are going to use, put the paint on a paper towel, let the oil soak out, in your case, at least three hours I would say. Then, with the knife, you mix some poppy seed oil or walnut oil if you like (I'd use poppy oil for the faster drying pigments, the earths and the cobalts) in the dense paint till you get the desired consistency.

    Some colors are rapid driers in themselves, as you probably know, they will still dry harder but I guess with poppy oil you might gain a day.

    If you like this method, you might consider opening your tubes at the back, scraping all the paint out, letting all of it drain on paper towels, and refill the tubes with the poppy / walnut added. You might mix some walnut into the poppy if you don't like the thickness of poppy oil.

    This will take care of two problems: it'll drain most of the manufacturers' oil (and added driers) out of the paint, and you can add a slower drying paint.

    Experiment!

    It works rather well. Or, grind your own paint! But grind it well, to get all the microscopic air bubbles out of it that'll make it dry fast just the same.
    WimVanAalst,

    These are good ideas. Draining and re-tubing might work, though it's a lot of trouble if there is an easier solution -- but it also might be the only solution!

    Certainly, trying to find a solution through experiment is a lot of work, too, but excellent advice. Grinding paint is even more work (and has its hazards)!
    The AMIEN Staff

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default Oil of cloves

    Quote Originally Posted by reroberts View Post
    You can also try adding a very small amount of oil of clove to your paint nut. Experiment with this on a sample panel to determine how much to use. It will definitely retard drying, and you don't necessarily have to blot existing oil from the paint.

    Hope this helps.
    reroberts,

    Yes, with this caveat: oil of cloves is a serious non-drier. Too much will definitely inhibit the drying of the entire paint film ...
    The AMIEN Staff

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    510

    Default

    When I first started painting, I was painting wet-into-wet, using poppy seed oil mixed into my oil paint. My paintings stayed open well in excess of one week. As long as one paints on a rigid support, this should be fine, right?

    Chad

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default More on slow-drying oil paints

    Quote Originally Posted by ottobooboo@yahoo.com View Post
    When I first started painting, I was painting wet-into-wet, using poppy seed oil mixed into my oil paint. My paintings stayed open well in excess of one week. As long as one paints on a rigid support, this should be fine, right?

    Chad
    ottobooboo,

    Right. Rigid supports are best for oil painting, too.
    The AMIEN Staff

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