+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    29

    Default a useful concoction?

    I use OMS to thin paint. I also use classic medium with damar/turp/linseed oil.

    OMS does not dissolve damar and leaves a sticky residue in the brushes. I wonder if it would be sound to add a wee touch of turpentine to my OMS to thin the damar residue in my brushes as I paint.

    It seems that the concoction would be less smelly/toxic than straight turpentine and more effective than OMS.

    Or would my studio explode?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default A useful concoction?

    Quote Originally Posted by pineywoods belle View Post
    I use OMS to thin paint. I also use classic medium with damar/turp/linseed oil.

    OMS does not dissolve damar and leaves a sticky residue in the brushes. I wonder if it would be sound to add a wee touch of turpentine to my OMS to thin the damar residue in my brushes as I paint.

    It seems that the concoction would be less smelly/toxic than straight turpentine and more effective than OMS.

    Or would my studio explode?
    pineywoods belle,

    You can try this, and have no fear that your studio will explode ... unless it's an unventilated cramped studio space and you have 50 candles burning for light.

    A caveat to consider. Both OMS and gum turps are toxic, no matter what.
    The AMIEN Staff

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    19

    Default A Useful Concoction?

    Pineywoods,
    I doubt your idea to sneak some turps
    into your media'll work, but see whether
    that'll cut it.
    Although that medium is indeed classic;
    in fact, that precise medium prescribed a
    class I was in with a professor/painter, a
    highly esteemed painter (and doubtless,
    used that medium himself), I believe the
    use of turpentine in US classrooms be
    legally prohibited, thus, if your paintings be
    executed in class, may not be done with
    damar, there anyway.
    Although the usage of damar's been a
    staple of painting history for centuries,
    for some reason, the Save-Em-All Polizie
    made this their jihad du jour - Why
    not simply instead assure that the studi-
    os are simply well-ventilated?!
    Which they legally must be anyway.
    a

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default A useful concoction?

    Quote Originally Posted by AFLoewy View Post
    Pineywoods,
    I doubt your idea to sneak some turps
    into your media'll work, but see whether
    that'll cut it.
    Although that medium is indeed classic;
    in fact, that precise medium prescribed a
    class I was in with a professor/painter, a
    highly esteemed painter (and doubtless,
    used that medium himself), I believe the
    use of turpentine in US classrooms be
    legally prohibited, thus, if your paintings be
    executed in class, may not be done with
    damar, there anyway.
    Although the usage of damar's been a
    staple of painting history for centuries,
    for some reason, the Save-Em-All Polizie
    made this their jihad du jour - Why
    not simply instead assure that the studi-
    os are simply well-ventilated?!
    Which they legally must be anyway.
    a
    AFLoewy,

    Whether turps can be used in a studio classroom at a school is a local option. A school, or a state, may prohibit it, but the feds are not involved.

    As for whether a studio is well-ventilated, have you looked into the cost of a first-class ventilation system lately? That is, one that will pull 6-10 air changes per hour and replace the exhausted air with fresh air from the outside. It's one thing to build this into a new construction, and 10 times as expensive to retrofit an older building.

    No school can afford to do that without serious financial help, and we have yet to hear of a state making an unfunded mandate like that on a school. We have seen the feds fine schools for improper handling/disposal of hazardous waste, but have never encountered a requirement for improved ventilation.
    The AMIEN Staff

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pineywoods belle View Post
    I use OMS to thin paint. I also use classic medium with damar/turp/linseed oil.

    OMS does not dissolve damar and leaves a sticky residue in the brushes. I wonder if it would be sound to add a wee touch of turpentine to my OMS to thin the damar residue in my brushes as I paint.

    It seems that the concoction would be less smelly/toxic than straight turpentine and more effective than OMS.

    Or would my studio explode?
    Since turpentine is so much more volatile than OMS the extra turp you add is likely to flash off while you are working with it. That is why your medium is gumming up, the turp is evaporating. (the damar you used out of the bottle already is dissolved in turp.)

    And BTW, this medium is not a classic but a fairly modern substitute for copal and amber based cooked resins. As for toxicity, search on turp and damar to get all the info you need.
    Thomas Jefferson Kitts
    AMIEN Moderator

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default OMS vs turps, redux, redux, quack

    Quote Originally Posted by thokitts View Post
    Since turpentine is so much more volatile than OMS the extra turp you add is likely to flash off while you are working with it. That is why your medium is gumming up, the turp is evaporating. (the damar you used out of the bottle already is dissolved in turp.)

    And BTW, this medium is not a classic but a fairly modern substitute for copal and amber based cooked resins. As for toxicity, search on turp and damar to get all the info you need.
    thokitts,

    Very good, and thanks.
    The AMIEN Staff

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

About AMIEN

AMIEN is the only unbiased source of information about art materials on the internet. Guaranteed. AMIEN is a resource for artists dedicated to providing the most comprehensive, up-to-date, accurate, and unbiased factual information about artists' materials.

Contact AMIEN

Administrator
Mark Gottsegen
Email AMIEN

All material on this site prepared by AMIEN is protected by Copright © 2006 - 2011.
All other copyrights are reserved by their respective holders.