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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    33

    Default Directly paint with acrylics on raw linen and burlap

    Dear AMIEN,

    I intend to do a series on raw linen and burlap that I intend to buy on a roll, painting with acrylics.
    I'd like to use the raw linen/burlap look without any white primer, just have the paint and the background being the raw linen/burlap.
    Which is the best way (if there is one) to prime them and keep the "raw look"?
    Or can I paint directly on them? (I doubt it...)

    Any suggestions?

    Best,
    Mouna

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default Directly paint with acrylics on raw linen and burlap

    Quote Originally Posted by Mouna View Post
    Dear AMIEN,

    I intend to do a series on raw linen and burlap that I intend to buy on a roll, painting with acrylics.
    I'd like to use the raw linen/burlap look without any white primer, just have the paint and the background being the raw linen/burlap.
    Which is the best way (if there is one) to prime them and keep the "raw look"?
    Or can I paint directly on them? (I doubt it...)

    Any suggestions?

    Best,
    Mouna
    Mouna,

    Burlap is a temporary support at best. It will get brittle within a year.

    But you can use the linen, no problem. There is a very rough linen available that may be similar to burlap in texture -- but it's expensive.

    We don't advise painting directly on the linen because the primer/ground makes a physical separation between the support and the paint -- a support can be damaged and if there is a ground between it and the painting that could save the painting from damage. You could use a clear acrylic dispersion primer -- we think two purveyors of this material are Golden Artist Colors and Winsor & Newton.
    The AMIEN Staff

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AMIEN View Post
    Mouna,

    Burlap is a temporary support at best. It will get brittle within a year.

    But you can use the linen, no problem. There is a very rough linen available that may be similar to burlap in texture -- but it's expensive.

    We don't advise painting directly on the linen because the primer/ground makes a physical separation between the support and the paint -- a support can be damaged and if there is a ground between it and the painting that could save the painting from damage. You could use a clear acrylic dispersion primer -- we think two purveyors of this material are Golden Artist Colors and Winsor & Newton.
    AMIEN, and anyone else who can help...

    I have been looking for rough linen (primed or unprimed) for quite a while now and haven't been able to find a ready source anywhere. There was once something produced called Yarka, manufactured in Russia, and then for a short while in China, but it does not seem to be presently available. Do you know of any current sources? The rough weave is good for old-school landscape painting...

    Nothing like a busman's holiday question, eh?
    Thomas Jefferson Kitts
    AMIEN Moderator

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default "a busman's holiday"

    Quote Originally Posted by thokitts View Post
    AMIEN, and anyone else who can help...

    I have been looking for rough linen (primed or unprimed) for quite a while now and haven't been able to find a ready source anywhere. There was once something produced called Yarka, manufactured in Russia, and then for a short while in China, but it does not seem to be presently available. Do you know of any current sources? The rough weave is good for old-school landscape painting...

    Nothing like a busman's holiday question, eh?
    thokitts,

    Wow. " ... a busman's holiday ... " We haven't heard that term in decades. You must be "extremely old," as our teenagers would put it.

    Yarka's products came through Jack Richeson & Company for a year or two. When Jack started getting complaints, that was the end of that.
    The AMIEN Staff

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    260

    Default Linen Sacking

    Try the search terms "linen sacking" or "linen burlap". A wholesale source will not have the stuff Yarka sold listed as "canvas" since it's more of a utility cloth.
    Last edited by Matthew Kinsey; 01-13-2013 at 09:30 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    7

    Default how about GAC100 or Matte Medium(also Fluid Matte medium)?

    GAC 100 has two options- Sizing layer & Grounding layer .

    In your csae, I think , there are 2 ways to meet your needs.

    1. apply 2 coats of GAC100 over raw linen(or any fabrics) . Then start acrylic painting~!! . simple & best way to your case. Moreover GAC100 is very important because of being SID (Support Induced Discoloration) Blocker~!!

    2. apply 2 coats of GAC100 over raw linen(or any fabrics) followed by apply 1~2 coats of Matte medium(or Fluid Matte medium) over GAC100 layer. Then start acrylic painting~!!.

    whatever 1 or 2 , there are no white acrylic dispersion ground (aka. gesso ) ~!!

    and GAC 100, Matte medium and Fluid Matte medium are products of GOLDEN company.

    I think GOLDEN's tech sheets are great helper.Should visit their website. www.goldenpaints.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default How about GAC100 or Matte Medium(also Fluid Matte medium)?

    Quote Originally Posted by pyrobaby View Post
    GAC 100 has two options- Sizing layer & Grounding layer .

    In your csae, I think , there are 2 ways to meet your needs.

    1. apply 2 coats of GAC100 over raw linen(or any fabrics) . Then start acrylic painting~!! . simple & best way to your case. Moreover GAC100 is very important because of being SID (Support Induced Discoloration) Blocker~!!

    2. apply 2 coats of GAC100 over raw linen(or any fabrics) followed by apply 1~2 coats of Matte medium(or Fluid Matte medium) over GAC100 layer. Then start acrylic painting~!!.

    whatever 1 or 2 , there are no white acrylic dispersion ground (aka. gesso ) ~!!

    and GAC 100, Matte medium and Fluid Matte medium are products of GOLDEN company.

    I think GOLDEN's tech sheets are great helper.Should visit their website. www.goldenpaints.com
    pyrobaby,

    We have to point out a couple of things.

    1. There are other brands of mediums and grounds that will work, too. Liquitex, Winsor & Newton, Graham, da Vinci, and so on. GAC 100 is, however, a unique medium.

    2. Although Golden says it's OK, we are still a bit reluctant to recommend using a medium as a ground. A medium, it seems to us, is not open enough to be absorbent or have a decent tooth.

    3. No matter what, the acrylic dispersion ground is not "gesso."
    The AMIEN Staff

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    33

    Default GAC 100

    Quote Originally Posted by AMIEN View Post
    pyrobaby,

    We have to point out a couple of things.

    1. There are other brands of mediums and grounds that will work, too. Liquitex, Winsor & Newton, Graham, da Vinci, and so on. GAC 100 is, however, a unique medium.

    2. Although Golden says it's OK, we are still a bit reluctant to recommend using a medium as a ground. A medium, it seems to us, is not open enough to be absorbent or have a decent tooth.

    3. No matter what, the acrylic dispersion ground is not "gesso."
    Is it possible to dilute the GAC 100 without it loosing a lot of its propertiess? and if yes what would be the proportion?.
    I'm asking knowing that it comes quite fluid, it is just that it is also so expensive when you have a multitude of panels...

    Thanks,
    Mouna

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    9,067

    Default Diluting GAC 100

    Quote Originally Posted by Mouna View Post
    Is it possible to dilute the GAC 100 without it loosing a lot of its propertiess? and if yes what would be the proportion?.
    I'm asking knowing that it comes quite fluid, it is just that it is also so expensive when you have a multitude of panels...

    Thanks,
    Mouna
    Mouna,

    Unless the manufacturer approves of it, we do not recommend diluting GAC 100.
    The AMIEN Staff

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Gamblin makes a PVA size meant to be used in the same way as a traditional rabbit skin glue size to isolate the support before the application of gesso. It is very thin. You might try using it as your initial application before applying a product like the GAC 100.

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